Boggy Lawn Solutions

Boggy lawns are a pretty common problem for homeowners in Auckland, where many areas have clay soils. High-density soils such as clay soil and compacted soil have low percolation, which means they drain water slowly. As such, they tend to get waterlogged easily in a flash rain, resulting in a soggy lawn.

 

Having a boggy lawn can be problematic in a number of ways. For one, it can cause flooding. In the event of a heavy rain, the surface water from your lawn might find its way into your basement. Things can get really messy and costly to deal with. If you are growing a garden, poor drainage can drown your flowers and vegetation.

Fortunately, there are a number of subsoil solutions for soggy lawns. The right method will depend on how big your lawn is, how often it gets wet and how long it remains wet.

If the lawn is relatively small, it might be easier to eliminate the problem rather than solve it. In other words, you might want to consider altering your lawn. A well-draining soil needs air in it. In the case of clay, the tiny soil particles are compacted so they don’t allow much room for air. To manage this, you can introduce lots of organic matter such as compost and aged manure to lighten the soil. Organic matter will force the tightly packed soil particles apart, resulting in improved drainage. If you are growing a garden, another option for you is to build raised beds on top of the clay. Planting a cover crop with a deep root system, such as clover, turnip and alfalfa, can also aerate the soil.

If altering your lawn isn’t an option or if your soil is heavy clay, a more effective solution is to install underground drainage pipes or tiles. This is done by laying clay or plastic pipes beneath the ground to create a soakaway that will drain the water off your lawn.  A soakaway is a hole dug in the ground that’s filled with coarse stones, gravel or any material that will allow the runoff to percolate back into the ground faster.

 

It might sound like a project you can DIY, but it’s a lot of physical labour and can become costly if you make even a small mistake. It also requires precise engineering to ensure proper water runoff and percolation in even the heaviest rains.

We know this very well and we’ve seen a lot of botched DIY attempts at managing a clay lawn, which is why Drainage NZ offers affordable, engineered basement and garage flooding solutions for Auckland. We remedy boggy lawns by installing complaint garden drainage. The process involves soil assessment and percolation tests, so we can determine exactly how to work around your lawn.

Once we have determined the ground slope, percolation rate and the proper location for the drainage pipes, we’ll build a trench filled with loose soil or gravel that will receive the surface water. This is also where the drainage pipes will be laid. The width of the drainage area will depend on the rate at which water must be absorbed back into the ground. If the lawn tends to get waterlogged relatively fast, the trench will have to be larger and filled with gravel instead of loose soil. The drainage pipe used here has special holes in them to allow the water in the trench to enter and be swiftly carried away to a catch area.

The good thing about this solution is it can be integrated into your garden design. It doesn’t have to be an odd line of gravel around your lawn as the drain can be covered by turf or made into an attractive footpath.

Flushing Tampons Down The Drain, What A Pain!

Flushing a used tampon seems like the most convenient course of action – it’s totally mess free and you won’t have to go looking for a nearby rubbish bin. However, in this case, the easiest option isn’t the best.

It’s not a secret that flushing tampons down the loo can clog up the plumbing system and harm the environment. Even tampon brands have these warnings explicitly written on their product packaging.

The problem with flushing tampons

Tampons are designed to be super absorbent. Once they go down the drain, they absorb all the water they can hold and expand like crazy. In fact, they can expand up to ten times their original size. And since they cannot be processed by wastewater treatment facilities, drains are bound to get clogged up by years’ worth of used tampons. Need proof? Have a look at what we found on our recent drain unblocking and CCTV drain inspection work.

Sure they are ‘flushable’ in the sense that they go down the drain without any problems. But the truth is tampons don’t break down in seconds like tissue paper does. Even the biodegradable options take months to break down, so they remain practically intact while they’re making their way through the pipes or the sewage treatment system.

When all those tampons accumulate in the pipes, they can cause blockage which is both problematic and costly. This costs utilities billions of dollars in repair and maintenance costs each year. And you can bet it will cost you a fortune if it happens on your property. If you have a septic tank, the tampons will sink to the bottom and impede the tank’s ability to function.

The result? Blocked drains can cause flooding, health risks and damage to property. It can be very costly to fix these problems.

Aside from causing blockage, flushed tampons can get into clean water sources when the sewer pipes back up and the wastewater overflows into our creeks, rivers and streams. In some instances, they bypass sewage treatment facilities altogether and end up directly in waterways. They not only become an eyesore but can also harm wildlife. In fact, thousands of marine animals and seabirds die from ingestion of marine litter, which include tampons.

Now, if you think flushing tampons down the drain instead of throwing it in the bin is keeping them away from landfills, hold that thought. Any waste that gets caught in the sewage are eventually strained out and sent to – you guessed it – a landfill. So that’s basically just taking the longer route.

What can you do about it?

For starters, follow the 3P’s rule, which is to flush only pee, poop and paper (sparingly). Wrap your used tampon in tissue and throw it in the rubbish bin where it belongs. It’s that simple.

How about the ones that are already down the drain? If water from your pipes is starting to back up or if your drains aren’t working as well as they should, call our team for a drain unblocking and CCTV survey. During inspection, we’ll send a tiny camera down your pipes to locate the source of the blockage before attempting any treatment. This saves a great deal of your time and money, since we can provide the right solution based on concrete evidence and diagnosis. It also means we won’t have to go digging around in your property to find the problem.

For more information, don’t hesitate to call us on 0800 DRAINLAYER (0800 372 465).

What To Do If Your Drains Are Not Draining

Are your drains slacking on the job? Maybe you’ve noticed that your drains are not draining as quickly as they used to, or maybe they are even flooding! If that is the case, you most likely have a blocked drain, and this is not as uncommon as you may think.

Why do drains block?
Common caused for drains getting blocked include:

  • Rubbish stuck in pipe
  • Leaves or other substances blocking the pipe
  • Damage or collapsed pipe
  • Tree roots which have grown into the pipe and blocked it
  • Silt and dirt build up after years of drainage service

Blocked drains are actually a common problem and can cause serious issues if left untreated. Blocked drains can cause health issues and property damage. If you have noticed a blocked drain, you would be wise to act on it.

What to do if you notice a blocked drain
If you notice a blocked drain, you should pick up the phone and call a drain unblocker. The best and fastest way to see what is causing the blockage is by means of a CCTV drain inspection. The drain unblocker will put a CCTV camera down the drain to see what is causing the blockage, and once this is known then appropriate action can be decided.

Here is an example of a CCTV drain inspection:

Once the blockage has been identified, it can now be decided how to best tackle the problem. The solution will depend on whether it’s a blockage or whether the drain is damaged.

If the problem is a blockage, the most likely course of action wiull be to unblock it by means of Hydro jetting. This involves putting a jetting hose down the drain, which sprays water through a water jet at very high pressure to clear any blockages. This method is faster and cheaper than all other drain unblocking solutions, and can be used on all sizes of drain pipes.

If the drain has been damaged, whether it’s by tree roots, burst pipe or otherwise, the solution will involve repairing the broken section of pipe. This is more complicated than a drain unblocking but is necessary to get sorted.

If you are having drainage issues, contact us today by calling 0800 372 465 and let us solve your drainage problem!

 

Hynds Streetware Product Range

When it comes to streetware castings, there is one brand name that quickly comes to mind: Hynds.

Hynds Pipe Systems Limited is New Zealand’s premier supplier of water and water-based waste management systems for civil, rural and infrastructure applications. This massive family business has built a name and a strong culture through innovation and partnership, which evidently shows in the quality and durability of their products.

To date, Hynds has a nationwide network of 32 merchant branches and over 40,000 product lines, including a full range of innovative Streetware products.

Hynds Streetware

The brand offers a comprehensive range of spun and precast products that include:

  • Traditional cast iron manhole cover and frame sets
  • Cast iron manhole grates, inspection covers, carriageway covers
  • Stormwater grates
  • Safety grilles
  • Surface boxes
  • Kerb and channel grates

All of their products meet currently recognised Australian Standards AS3996-2006 and European Standards EN 124, as well as the loading requirements specified in Transit NZ’s HN-HO-72 standards.

Hynds’ castings load rated for a wide range of applications, from light duty pedestrians to heavy duty carriageway locations, and extreme heavy duty and trafficable airport runways. For your reference, here are the internally approved load classifications:

Cast iron is traditionally used for manhole covers for its robust and reliable nature. Hynds use Gray (Flake Graphite) Grade T220 cast iron in most of their infrastructure castings, making sure the design and quality meets both municipal and regional specific standard requirements. Currently, they are supplying manhole access covers and frames specifically to the council standards of Napier, Palmerston North, Christchurch, Queenstown and Invercargill regions.

Among its product lines are:

  1. Cast Iron Access Covers (Class B and Class D loads)
    With a 450-500mm clear opening, these access covers easily retrofit into existing concrete manhole tops, with a choice of flat or spigoted frames. There’s also a complementary range of circular manhole grates for these access covers.
  2.  

  3. Hytech Manhole Cover and Frame Sets
    NZ’s local authority called for cast iron streetware products to be manufactured to a recognised standard and tested by an independent third party. Hynds responded with its Hytech range, which carry the NZ Standards Mark and accredited by OPUS International Consultants. Each product in the range is load tested to Australian Standard AS3996.
  4.  

  5. Cast Iron inspection Covers (Class A load)
    This range consist of light duty, non trafficable inspection covers and frames for grease traps, electrical pits and other areas where regular maintenance is required. The inspection covers can be made watertight and airtight by adding a silicon sealant. It’s locked down with stainless steel allen head screws to prevent theft or unauthorised access.
  6.  

  7. Cast Iron Storm Water Grates (Class B to D loads)
    These grates are suited to the standard range of concrete cesspits and sized to suit standard sump range. For 675x450mm sump sets, you can have the option for adding anti-theft brackets and screws.
    This particular range is compatible with all regional council requirements for Whangarei, Bay of Plenty, Hamilton, Palmerston North, Napier, Wellington, Christchurch, Queenstown, Dunedin and Invercargill.
  8.  

  9. Non Slip Heelguard Grates (Class A and Class D loads)
    Particularly suited for pedestrians and areas with expected heavy foot traffic, this range features non-slip epoxy coating and long-lasting galvanised steel construction. Hynds’ Heelguard grates have a flat-edged frame to ensure ease of use with concrete/asphalt pavers, and are compatible with standard concrete sumps.
    Grate and frames sets are available for trenches and cesspits.
  10.  

  11. Manhole Safety Grilles
    Hynds supply two Watercare-approved brands of stormwater and manhole safety grilles: Caliber and Impact. Both can be retrofitted into existing and new manholes, but Impact grilles can be adjusted to suit a wide range of opening sizes.
  12.  

  13. Surface Boxes
    A full range of surface boxes made for hydrants, lampholes, pressure sewers, valves and Toby boxes, all of which meet regional and municipal council requirements.
  14.  

  15. G.A.T.I.C Range
    Sourced from internationally recognised manufacturers, the products in this range are gas, water and airtight with load ratings from Class B (Pedestrian) to Class F/G (Airports/Ports).The Infilled/Solid Top Covers and Decorative Edged Covers feature machined mating surfaces and decorative edge (on request). It comes in either a single or a multiple-part cover and frame set. There are also options for square, rectangle, tee or cellular frames.Meanwhile, the Xpave Infilled Covers are designed with a deep recess to accommodate thicker pavers as well as to make access points discreet and unobtrusive in pedestrians and trafficable areas. The covers are laser-cut for utmost precision.
  16.  

  17. UBER
    Made with Spheroidal Graphite Grade 500/7, the ductile iron access covers in this range are lightweight and robust but 30% lighter than traditional cast iron. Personalisation is the hallmark of this range, with specific council designs already in supply. The system features bolt down security that meet the HN-HO-72 requirements for sewer and stormwater lids.
  18.  

  19. Di-Hinged Carriageway Covers
    Manufactured in France for high intensity traffic environments, these ductile iron-hinged access cover system exceeds expectations in terms of strength, performance, stability and protection against water ingress.The range features 360-degree EPDM sealing rubber for non-rock stability, cover locks that open at 90 degrees and personalisation options.
    There are four models in this range: MAESTRO, TWINO, MAXIMO and SOLO. The first three models are load rated to 400kN, while SOLO is designed to suit higher loadings up to 900kN in industrial settings.
  20.  

  21. Ductile Iron Stormwater Grates and Frames (Class D240)
    Designed with improved hydraulic capture, higher loadings, cycle friendliness and greater aesthetic appeal in mind, these stormwater system features side-locking frames and anti-theft hinge and bolt. It fits standard concrete sumps.
  22.  

  23. Stormwater Kerb and Channel Grates (Class C260)
    Manufactured in France, Hynds stormwater grates are cycle friendly and meet special requirements associated with smaller subdivision streetscapes.

For the full product specifications and information, see the Streetware product catalogue.

Is Basement Waterproofing (Tanking) Paint-On Membrane The Solution?

In theory, a basement built in decent, free-draining ground conditions will stay dry. But if there’s a build-up of water in the ground surrounding the basement, the water will penetrate the floor and walls through any cracks, joints or structural weaknesses in the basement. This water ingress can lead to mould growth, decay and leaking.

For obvious reasons, a basement needs some form of waterproofing to prevent damp-related issues that could lead to more serious structural problems.

Waterproofing Membranes

The easiest known method of basement waterproofing is applying an external membrane or liquid coating on the outside and/or inside of the wall to create a hydrophobic barrier.

Some waterproofing membranes are “stick-on” plastic sheets that are inexpensive and quite simple to apply. However, these membranes can easily lose adhesion when things get wet on site or when there is high humidity during application. These can also be damaged during backfilling operation or incorrectly installed by the contractor. A better option is a “paint-on” waterproofing membrane, which has less room for builder error and last a long time. These tanking membranes can be easily applied using a paint brush, roller or trowel.

Just like paint, there are different types of waterproofing membranes made for different structures and soil conditions.

For example, Cemix Crystalproof is a crystalline material which waterproofs and protects concrete in-depth. It can be used for both internal and external waterproofing of any structurally sound concrete (new or old), including moist or green concrete. Its ultra-strength bond ensures long-term protection even when subjected to high water pressure.

On the other hand, Aquastop is best used for concrete, block and masonry surfaces. It’s most suited for inside concrete block basements as it can withstand pressure from a head of water (hydrostatic pressure) and keeps internal areas dry, though it can also be applied externally.

For concrete block walls, retaining walls and timber posts, a stable flexible bituminous emulsion like Bituproof Plus works best as it does not creep under heat or slump in vertical surfaces. However, this product is only suitable for use on the positive side of the wall where water or moisture can enter the structure.

Elastomeric membranes like Cemix Rubberguard are an innovative waterproofing solution that offers the best durability. When applied systematically and allowed to cure completely, these membranes make basement walls impermeable to water, chemical vapours and subterranean gases. Rubberguard, in particular, has excellent adhesion properties over concrete, masonry, cement sheeting, renders, plaster board and wet area sheet surfaces.

Sealants and Joint Treatments

Other considerations in using basement tanking membranes are sealing active leaks or cracks and ensuring the corners and joints are also protected.

Crystalproof and Aquastop can both be used to seal minor cracks up to 0.4mm. Bigger cracks can be filled with the Cemix Quick Patch repair mortar. Block walls and floors with rising damp can be cured instantly using a nano-technology sealer like Cemprotect, which penetrates hydrophobic protection treatment for all cementitious substrates including natural and artificial stone. It’s designed to protect concrete from gradual water damage and enhance the effectiveness of the waterproofing membrane.

For the corners, pipes and joints, there are elastic bands and seal tapes specifically made for these volatile areas. The ones from Cemix Safeguard range are high-strength and tear resistant, offering long-term sealing protection.

Are Paint-on Tanking Membranes the Solution?

Paint-on membranes have the advantage of low in-place cost, quick application and excellent elongation. When applied correctly, they can last for decades. The chief disadvantage to them is the possible inconsistency in coverage. It takes careful application to achieve the minimum coverage thickness of 60mils.

Moreover, it’s good to remember that these cheap methods only manage the symptom rather than treat the cause. If you don’t solve the root of the problem, groundwater will still seep into anything that’s not 100% structurally perfect, including a tanking membrane that has not been applied properly.

So what’s a good basement waterproofing design?

It should include a system for removing excess water from the soil surrounding your property. An effective yet unobtrusive method is to install subsoil drainage, wherein drainage pipes are installed underground to intercept and convey subsurface or seepage water.

Benefits of subsoil drainage:

  • Protection from water damage
  • Increases stability of the ground and soil strength
  • Reduces foundation movements caused by the variations in the soil moisture content

The subsoil drainage system is ideally installed around the perimeter of your home so that the water gets drained before it reaches the foundation. If you have a retaining wall, it’s a good idea to locate the drainage pipe behind it to relieve hydrostatic pressure. The important thing to remember is to place the system above the natural water table so you’ll drain away the surface water, instead of groundwater.

The most common type of subsoil drainage is a special geotextile-covered pipe. The pipe has a number of perforations which allows water to be drained away to enter. The geotextile covering stops soil and other particles from going into the pipe and clogging it up. A simpler type of subsoil drainage is buried rocks or pebbles, which acts as a free draining system. The subsoil drainage must discharge water into a cesspit or holding pit, where any debris is cleaned out, before overflowing into an approved point of outfall such as soakholes, a curb discharge or an existing stormwater system.

To prevent clogging, the drain pipes should be at least 7.5mm in diameter and the trenches should be 300mm-wide at the very least. Drain envelopes are installed around a subsoil drain to provide structural bedding for the pipe and increase the effective surface area of the drain.

The Verdict

Basement waterproofing membranes are great if you need a quick fix that is inexpensive. But the fact is they don’t solve the problem at all and there’s still a risk of running into bigger problems later that costs more to repair.

Installing a subsoil drainage system should tackle the problem at its roots. If you need more information about it, call us on 0800 372 465.

Stormwater Galv Kerb Outlet Installation

What is a kerb outlet? They are essential parts of drainage systems which serve to remove the excess water from your property by directing it to the kerb on the street, which will then flow into the stormwater system.

Firstly, kerb has two spellings, also being written as curb. “Curb” is the American spelling of the word, where as “kerb” is the correct English standard as has been used since the mid 17th century. Since in New Zealand we use the English standard, we will go with the spelling “kerb”.

Kerb outlets can be used in conjunction with driveway channels, gutters and other types of water removal drainage systems.

We just completed a job for a customer which involved installing a kerb outlet for their stormwater drainage system.

For this job, we had to remove part of the footpath as well as some ground from their property in order to run the piping for the outlet. Once the ground was removed, we could lay down the pipe which was 100mm diameter uPVC in this case.

In this system the kerb outlet was used in conjunction with a 5,500L stormwater above ground detention tank. The outlet was connected to the gutter drain as a means of escape for the stormwater.

Once the pipes were laid, we reinstated the concrete on the foot path and to the neighbouring property that had to be removed. The road and driveway were then cleaned up from all the left overs of working there.

Why would you need to replace a kerb outlet?
Kerb outlets are crucial part of stormwater drainage systems that ensure that water being drained can be removed from the property onto the road, where it can then drain into the main drainage system. If your kerb outlet is blocked or damaged, you could find yourself with a flood in your yard, which could even cause damage to your home.

Do you need a kerb outlet for your drainage system? Contact us today to discuss your drainage needs.

Basement Flooding Problems Solved

Basements are inherently prone to flooding due to the fact that they are built partly or entirely below ground level. And thanks to gravity, water easily finds its way from high to low ground. If the water level around your home rises above the basement floor, then gravity will naturally move that water into your basement.

There are a number of reasons why basements flood.

  1. Surface inflow

Basement flooding is common during wet weather. During heavy rains or rapid snowmelts, surface water may accumulate around the house and find its way into hard surface depressions such as driveways or basements.

  1. Structural issue

If you notice a tiny wet spot in your basement, don’t assume it’s nothing. It could be a sign of a structural issue, like a crack in the foundation floor, that will allow groundwater to seep in. If left unresolved, that tiny spot could turn into full-on flooding that may cost you thousands in carpet damage, basement repairs and restoration.

  1. Foundation drainage failure

The foundation drainage system of your basement works to keep the ground water level lower than the basement floor, either by gravity or by pump.

Gravity foundation systems (weeping tiles) may get plugged by fine sediments or degrade over time. As a result, the system will cease to drain water by gravity. On the other hand, a sump pump built into the basement, which pumps out water around the foundation and discharge it into the lawn, could fail if they are plugged or can’t keep up with the incoming water.

  1. Sewer backup

By design, sanitary sewers have a path to the home called the sanitary sewer lateral. This allows domestic wastewater to flow from your home out to the sewer pipes. But when the sanitary lateral fails, sewage could backflow into your home.

The sanitary lateral fails if it is blocked by what is being flushed down the toilet, it is damaged due to aging or if the sewers are full. You’ll need a licensed plumber to carry out an assessment and resolve the issue properly.

  1. Broken or malfunctioning pipes

Plumbing failure can sometimes be to blame for basement flooding. A flood could break into the home’s internal water supply line in many ways – burst pipes, damage to aging plumbing equipment or failure of the hot-water tank.

What to Do When Your Basement is Flooded

  • First thing to do is switch off any power around the area. Never step into a flooded area before doing this. Call a qualified electrician if you’re not sure how to turn the power off.
  • If it’s not due to rainfall, it’s best to call in a licensed plumber to help you check the drains, sewers and pipes for the cause of the flooding.
  • Once the issue has been resolved, act fast in removing water from the basement. The longer the water sits, the more damage it will cause. Make sure to wear protective gloves and boots (and a nose plug if the smell is rank).
  • Remove all the stuff in your basement and allow everything to dry for 48 hours. If they remain wet after that, it’s best to discard those items to avoid mould or mildew. Don’t be tempted to keep soggy carpets or rugs, as they may carry bacterial contaminants.
  • Scrub and disinfect every inch of your basement, from floors to walls, cabinetry and hardware. Then allow to air out until totally dry.
  • If you have flood insurance, you may need to take photos of the damage for documentation purposes. Confirm your coverage and claims process.

 

 

Drain Unblocking and CCTV Inspection

Blocked drains can be a huge pain. Aside from the unpleasant smell and mess caused by the water backflow, you also have to deal with repair costs and the potential health hazards that may arise from it. While small blockage can be resolved using a drain snake or other home remedies, water backflow, leaks home remedies, chances are your drains, stormwater pipes or sewers need to be looked at by a professional.

At Drainage NZ, we have a team of master plumbers and repair engineers as well as modern equipment required for any drain-related jobs, including drain unblocking and CCTV inspection.

Drain clearance involves a two-step approach. First, we’ll carry out an inspection to identify what’s causing the blockage and where it is located. Then, we’ll prescribe the best technique to clear out your pipes.

Causes of Blockage

Blockage rarely happens since modern pipes and sewers are now manufactured to demanding standards. And if your pipes were installed by skilled drainlayers, the chances are even slimmer.

However, blockage does occur due to the following reasons:

  • Accumulated leaves and debris from trees
  • Tree roots that grow into the pipes through a crack of failed joint due to ground settlement
  • Badly aligned or broken pipes (usually there’s a lip obstruction where materials in the sewage flow get caught)
  • Tissue, sanitary pads and other products that are flushed in the toilet
  • Foreign objects that were forced down the drain
  • Accumulated food scraps and cooking grease

If water drains at a slower rate than normal or the toilet bowl fills to a higher level than usual after being flushed, chances are there’s already partial blockage. It’s best to call an engineer at this point to avoid a bigger headache later.

CCTV Inspection + Drain Clearance

To work out where the problem lies, first we check the disconnector trap (DT), the ground floor toilet bowl, the interceptor traps and the sewer pipes for any signs of blockage.

If the problem cannot be determined  by this process of elimination, we will conduct a CCTV drain survey. Using this technology ensures a speedy analysis, accurate diagnosis and minimal disruption as we no longer have to carry out a large excavation to locate the blockage. This also means less inconvenience and costs on your part.

We’ll locate a suitable entry point for the CCTV camera, inspect the condition of your underground pipes and determine the best way to go forward.

In some cases, we find that blockages are caused by the public drain/sewer failure and the liability is not yours. In such situations, we will advise you to ask your water company or the local authorities for recompense.

At Drainage NZ, we use waterjetting or hydro blasting to clear away debris, thaw frozen drains or break up fat deposits. If the blockage can’t be resolved this way, an excavation will be required to ensure the blockage is thoroughly cleared and won’t happen occur again in the future.

For more information about our drainage services, contact us today!

Cheap Subdivision Drainage Options In Auckland

According to the Stats NZ, as of August 2017, over 1184 new homes were consented. Auckland also experienced a record high for subdivision drainage during 2017-2018.

With demand comes an increase of service providers and naturally the more people competing for a commercial drainage or residential drainage job the lower the prices can get due to competition.

  

Whilst the consumer benefits from this, there are still significant challenges and traps to look out for.

Some of these include:

  • Does the company I’m awarding the project to have experience with sub-division drainage?
  • Are the drainlayers council and Watercare registered?
  • Does the company have extensive insurance cover?
  • Does the company have their own machinery? (Hiring equipment increases your costs)
  • Are you dealing with the people doing the work or are they passing on work/subcontracting jobs to other companies or tradesmen?

The answers to these questions will give you a good idea of whether you are selecting the right company for your job.

With so many building projects happening currently in Auckland, there are many people looking to take advantage of the situation and profit from it while doing substandard work. So while cheap quotes can be tempting, you have to be very careful as choosing the wrong drainlayer can cost you greatly further down the line. This especially applies with subdivisions, which require specialised drainage knowledge.

  

Some things to consider when getting drainage quotes:

  • What do previous customers of the drainlayer say about their work?
  • Do you know anyone personally who has used them before?
  • How detailed is their quote and do they cover everything they can, or are parts left out? (Apples for apples?)
  • What happens if extra work has to be undertaken?
  • Does the drainlayer offer some kind of guarantee?
  • Is the price too good to be true?

Paperwork

One very important factor to consider with subdivision drainage is the paperwork. This is often the number one cause for holdups in drainage jobs, and is where you will find you have issues when giving work to whoever is cheapest.

You drainlayer should be taking care of all the paperwork for the job, including applications to council, watercare requirements, and all information you need for Code Of Compliance. This is often where you will get delays if your drainlayer is not experienced in this process or doesn’t even do it. Make sure this is part of your quote!

We at Drainage NZ specialise in subdivision drainage in Auckland and can provide the solution you need for your building project. Speak to us today about getting a quote for a drainage system for your property and you can be sure you are getting the best in the industry working on your property.

 

The Dangers Of Non Compliant Drainage

Drainage can be a serious matter and improperly done drainage can cause serious problems to both property and health. Drainage work is taken very seriously in New Zealand and all work must follow the Land Drainage Act 1908.

What is the Land Drainage Act? The Drainage Act has been set in place to make clear what is and isn’t allowed to be done with drainage work in New Zealand. It goes into detail about all aspects of drainage, including who is responsible for what and how things need to be done.

If you are planning drainage work, you need to be aware of what the Act requires in order for your drainage system to comply. The best way to do this is to find a drainage expert who knows what needs to be done. They can advise you on the best way to accomplish what you want to achieve while making your system compliant.

What happens if your drainage is not compliant?

First and foremost, your drainage could be unsafe and could cause health concerns and property damage if something was to go wrong. There have been many horror stories of non compliant drainage causing serious problems to properties, land, even people’s health. Because you are dealing with hazardous waste in some drainage, it can be a serious issue.

Another factor is that non compliant drainage will not be covered by insurance, should some disaster strike. If you end up with damage to your property as a result of uncompliant drainage work, don’t expect your insurance company to pay for the repairs. You could also face fines depending on the situation.

How can you make sure all your drainage work is compliant?

When undertaking any drainage work, always make sure that your work is done by a qualified drainlayer who has experience and has shown that they know what they are doing. A competent drainlayer will always ensure that  their work meets all standards and meets all legal requirements.

We at Drainage NZ can help you with all drainage work. When you call us, you can be sure you are getting drainage experts who will ensure all work is done to meet all requirements and is done to the highest possible standard. Call us today for your drainage needs!